Palestinians

Will Canada demand labelling of Israeli settlement products? – a CTIP guest column

https://mondoweiss.net/2018/11/demonstrates-duplicity-government/

Members of Parliament are debating legislation to update the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. But it’s not all going smoothly. The NDP and Bloc Québecois are demanding an end to the mislabeling of Israeli settlement goods as “Product of Israel.” Meanwhile, a Canadian citizen’s case alleging improper labelling of Israeli settlement wines has reached the Federal Court of Canada. Will they succeed? Read more…

(more…)

Exactly 71 years ago, the UN voted to partition Palestine. Canada played a role. How well do you know Canadian history? Try this quiz.

un-partition-1947

The UN General assembly voted on Nov. 29th 1947 to partition Palestine. How many countries voted? What role did Canada play? And what happened next? Take this test to see the state of your knowledge.

CTIP history quiz

map_unpartition (1)

UN partition plan adopted Nov. 29, 1947 (but never implemented)

After WWI, Britain took over Palestine, promising to help create a “national homeland for the Jewish people” in Palestine.

In 1947, Britain decided to turn the future of Palestine over to the United Nations. The UN created a special committee to study the issue and its recommendation was put to a vote of the UN General Assembly on November 29, 1947.

Test your knowledge. Rate yourself: The right answers are below (no peeking)

  • Fewer than 10 correct answers – you need to brush up
  • 11- 15 right answers – impressive
  • 16 – 19 right answers – very impressive – a history buff!
  • 21 right answers – We are sure you peeked!!

 

QUESTIONS

  1. In the General Assembly vote in 1947, how did Canada vote “yes” or “no”?
  2. How many parts was Palestine to be divided into?
  3. Who cast Canada’s vote?
  4. What special role did Canada play?
  5. What did the New York Times call the proposal to partition Palestine?
  6. What Canadian diplomat was praised by jubilant Zionist groups as the “Lord Balfour of Canada”?
  7. How did the Palestinian delegation vote? Yes or no? (this is a trick question)
  8. Were the Jewish groups in Palestine in favour of, or opposed to, the partition plan?
  9. What was the final vote count in the UN General Assembly?
  10. After the vote, how much longer did British military forces remain in Palestine?
  11. What did the UN resolution say about the fate of the “minorities” living in each of the new states?
  12. Is that what happened?
  13. Were the Palestinians expelled militarily, or did they just “run away”?
  14. Where did non-Jewish Palestinians flee to?
  15. When did Israel declare itself as a State?
  16. How many Palestinians had been expelled or frightened into leaving by that date?
  17. When did neighbouring Arab countries declare war on the new State of Israel?
  18. What were the borders of the new State of Israel?
  19. How much longer did the expulsions continue?
  20. When hostilities ended in 1949, how many Palestinians were still in Israel, and how many had been made refugees in the West Bank, Gaza, and in neighbouring countries?

ANSWERS

  1. In the General Assembly vote in 1947, did Canada vote “yes” or “no” on the resolution to divide Palestine? Canada voted “yes” to the partition of Palestine.
  2. How many parts was Palestine to be divided into? Three: According to UN resolution 181,Palestine was to be divided into 1:  A Jewish State, 2: an Arab State, and 3:the City of Jerusalem which was to be independent, and under international protection as the shared heritage of the 3 major religions in the region: Christianity, Islam and Judaism.
  3. Who cast Canada’s vote? Canada’s vote was cast by our ambassador to the UN, Lester B. Pearson (later to become prime minister of Canada)
  4. What special role did Canada play? Canada was a member of a small sub-committee (UN Special committee on Palestine) that proposed partition.
  5. What did the New York Times call the proposal to partition Palestine? The New York Times called the partition plan “The Canadian plan”. (Engler, op. cit. p. 38)
  6. pearson-13120-portrait-medium

    Lester Pearson supported the partition of Palestine. Zionists called him the “Lord Balfour of Canada”

    What Canadian diplomat was praised by jubilant Zionist groups as the “Lord Balfour of Canada”? The same Lester B. Pearson. (ref: The Truth May Hurt, p. 39 by Yves Engler)

  7. How did the Palestinian delegation vote on the idea of partition? Yes or no? (this is a trick question) Palestine did not have a vote. It was not a member of the UN (it was still under the British mandate).
  8. Were the Jewish groups in Palestine in favour of, or opposed to, the partition plan? Jewish groups were divided. Some, like the Irgun militia group, were opposed to partition. They thought they deserved the whole of mandate Palestine. Others, like David Ben Gurion’s Jewish Agency, thought it was wiser to accept the partition as a temporary first step.
  9. What was the final vote count in the UN General Assembly? The vote was 38 in favour, 13 opposed, 10 abstaining, 1 absent. The UN had only 57 members in 1947, and was dominated by Europe and North American and Latin American nations.
  10. After the vote, how much longer did British military forces remain in Palestine? Palestine officially remained under British control for another 6 months, until May 15 1948.
  11. What did the UN resolution say about the fate of the “minorities” living in each of the new states? It said that everyone would “become citizens of the State in which they were resident and enjoy full civil and political rights

    irgun recruiting poster

    Irgun recruiting poster. It claimed all of Palestine and all of Jordan as part of “Erez Israel”

  12. Is that what happened? NO. The day after the UN vote, while Britain was still nominally in control and five months before Israel’s declaration of independence, Zionist militias began attacking Palestinians in Jaffa, the largest Palestinian city. This is described with remarkable frankness at the Etzel Museum, called the “Museum of the Liberation of Jaffa”.
  13. Were the Palestinians expelled militarily, or did they just “run away”? Some wealthy and well educated Palestinians fled right after partition sensing trouble ahead. In some villages there were massacres and people forced to leave at gunpoint. In other cases, people ran to safety when they heard about massacres in neighbouring villages which the British military made no effort to stop. But, international law makes no distinction between the two. They all are refugees
  14. Where did non-Jewish Palestinians flee to? The Zionist forces tried to push the Palestinians in specific directions. Some were pushed north to Lebanon, others went inland towards Syria and Jordan. Many fled to Gaza. Some went into hiding in the mountains or deserts inside what would become Israel.
  15. When did Israel declare itself as a State? Israel declared its independence on May 14th, 1948, the day before the British mandate was scheduled to end.
  16. How many Palestinians had been expelled or frightened into leaving by that date? It is estimated that when Israel declared independence, about 400,000 Palestinians had already been displaced.
  17. When did neighbouring Arab countries declare war on the new State of Israel? Neighbouring Arab countries declared war on Israel May 15th, 1948, the day after the British mandate ended and Israel had declared itself a state.
  18. What were the borders of the new State of Israel? Israel did not declare its borders. It continued to seize territory expelling more people. It finally signed a series of armistices with its neighbours establishing a temporary “green line”. This green line has become Israel’s “de facto” border, and allowing Israel to control of about 50% more land than was authorized by the UN vote.
  19. How much longer did the expulsions continue? Israeli forces continued rounding up and expelling Palestinians for another 8 or 9 months. Other mass expulsions occurred even after 1949.
  20. When hostilities ended in 1949, how many Palestinians were still in Israel, and how many had been made refugees in the West Bank, Gaza, and in neighbouring countries? At that time, there were still about 150,000 Palestinians inside Israel, and another 750,000 refugees spread out in the region.

________________________________________________________

Canada Talks Israel Palestine (CTIP) aims to promote a serious discussion in Canada about the complicated and emotional Israel/Palestine issue. This requires a good knowledge about historical facts. If we have our facts wrong, please help us. We encourage brief comments (under 100 words) from serious readers. To learn more about what we do, contact us at chair.ctip@gmail.com. 

Youthful protest leader invites Prime Minister Trudeau to visit Gaza

Ahmed Abu Artema

CTIP has received a copy of an open letter from Ahmad Abu Artema, one of the key organizers of the Palestinian ‘Great March of Return’ in Gaza, inviting Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau to come and visit Gaza. ‘You will see we are not hate fueled terrorists, but desperate young people searching for a solution to our unfair situation,’ he writes. Read more. (more…)

Trudeau to give long-overdue apology on November 7 for Canada’s anti-Semitic 1939 refusal to accept Jewish refugees

st louis passengers 2.jpg

Happy Jewish refugees on board the MS St. Louis in 1939, still hoping to escape the Holocaust. But at a time when anti-Semitism was widespread, they were refused entry to Canada. Many ended up murdered in concentration camps.  While no longer rampant in Canada, anti-Semitism still exists and should be opposed by everyone. But what is anti-Semitism, exactly? CTIP offers a definition. Read more. (more…)

Human Rights Watch calls for western governments to suspend aid to Palestinian security forces ‘until human rights abuses stop’

Image result for canadian aid to palestinian authority

Canada began providing financial (and military) help to the security forces of the Palestinian Authority (PA) under the Harper government. Human Rights Watch claims that those PA security forces are implicated in widespread arbitrary arrest and torture. Many human rights activists in the West Bank say the PA is more active in defending Israel than the rights of Palestinians. Read more.

(more…)